A damage culture

Share Damage [1] is a fictional card game described in the science fiction novel Consider Phlebas by Iain M. Like Pokerthe game is simple and involves psychology and bluff, but it also has added dimensions. Each player must bring Lives to the table, these being individuals who are willing to be used as tokens in the game. Each time a player loses a showdown, one of his or her Lives is killed.

A damage culture

Filipinos pride themselves on their lifelong loyalty to family, schoolmates, compadres, members of the same tribe, residents of the same barangay Because these boundaries are limited to the family or tribe, they exclude at any given moment 99 percent of the other people in the country.

Because of this fragmentation, this lack of useful nationalism, people treat each other worse in the Philippines than in any other Asian country I have seen We met up with a lot of such enterprising journalists in those days, when the Philippines was the darling of the West and stories about Philippine politics were snapped up by editors who could not get enough of our peaceful transition from dictatorship to democracy.

His judgment stung--"lack of useful nationalism", "a feeble sense of national interest"--being the worst of all. But what stayed with me was his observation that "people treat each other worse in the Philippines than in any other Asian country I have seen And they are seeing that the mirror he held to our A damage culture in may have been accurate then, and is certainly accurate now.

Just observing the Philippine Senate-traditionally been the breeding ground for Presidents- holding a public hearing for ten minutes, we see the worst possible example of tribal fragmentation among the local elite.

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Administration and opposition senators regard each other with undisguised distrust and disgust, and treat their witnesses-invited guests, if you will--even worse. When the senators cannot get them to dance to their partisan tunes, they call them liars and obstructionists, put words in their mouths and threaten them with contempt and detention.

With kid gloves off and cloven hooves and fangs showing, they gnarl and leap at one another, as well as at anyone whom they wish to bully to follow their line. All the while, of course, they are protected by parliamentary immunity from anyone who wishes to fight back.

Pacifico Ortiz SJ, in an invocation at the opening of Congress, described the country as trembling on the edge of a smoldering volcano. Well, 32 years later, we are back on the edge of that volcano, which goes to show that we have learned little-if anything - in the last 32 years. Perhaps we never really left the edge; the volcano just dissipated for a while when the dictator departed, and we mistook the restoration of the trappings of democracy for the fundamental changes we needed to implement.

But as it turns out, we have only marked time, wallowing in a culture so damaged, it has, as James Fallows so astutely observed, stood in the way of our development and has made a naturally rich country poor. The Philippines, wrote Fallows, describing the situation here, is "a society that has degenerated into a war of every man against every man.

Newspapers are raking it in with paid advertisements from sectoral groups and NGOs pleading with the administration to act on the plight of the poor and powerless, with supposed coup plotters to abandon their destructive ambitions to rule the country by military force, with politicians to set aside their partisan agendas and focus on the larger picture, and with the media to help set a forward-looking agenda for the country, and not be content to merely reflect the mire it is in.

The paid advertisements are starting to become news items themselves, especially for a people used to getting their information from reading between the lines.

The call of the hour is for everyone to think outside of themselves and consider the country, the people, our children, and--as the visiting Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra told Filipino businessmen on Monday--think of the next generation.

Please share THE FILIPINO MIND via social media here: It became a controversy because of his bravery to criticize the culture of many Filipinos.
Popular Topics Filipinos pride themselves on their lifelong loyalty to family, schoolmates, compadres, members of the same tribe, residents of the same barangay Because these boundaries are limited to the family or tribe, they exclude at any given moment 99 percent of the other people in the country.
Education Secretary DeVos’ Yacht Vandalized, Causing Thousands in Damage A Damage Culture is a new Philippines? But I could say that the description of the writer is strongly evident until now.
A damage culture My husband had brought home a photocopy from his graduate class at UP, and I remember the outrage I felt within me.

Thaksin seemed to be talking about the ruinous politics in the land when he told the business leaders the difference between a politician and a statesman: If you think about the next generation, then you can do a lot of change.

Nothing else --not self-praise, not self-flagellation, and not those occasional spurts of national pride-- has made us the nation that we ought to be by now. And to make sure they understand it, maybe we should commission an illustrated-comics version.

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A damage culture

The postings are oftentimes long and a few readers have claimed being "burnt out.Cybelle Yao INTSOCI- C31 A Damaged Culture By James Fallows (Reaction Paper) I agree with what James Fallows () had said in his article that culture can make a naturally rich country poor because that is how the Philippine culture is now.

It may not be as a whole, but the identity of Philippine culture has been lost for a long time now.5/5(2). To actually suggest that learning a subject with “unfeelingness” is going to create “collateral damage” of any kind is certainly an absurd one — and Culture.

Toronto Film Festival. This way of thinking was described by Fallows as a damaged culture, as if there was a perfect one that was possible. Perhaps at this time, , with America having a government shutdown, he knows for sure that he is not living in one.

A Damaged Culture. Our Asia correspondent offers a dark view of a nation not only without nationalism but also without much national pride. Still, for all the damage Marcos did, it’s not. Damage is a fictional card game described in the science fiction novel Consider Phlebas by Iain M. Banks. Like Poker, the game is simple and involves psychology and bluff, but it also has added dimensions.

Each player must bring Lives to the table, these being individuals who are willing to be. Where there is a culture of human sacrifice, widow burning, and oppression, that culture should be changed — damaged, if you will.

Animism, for example, is a cultural belief that is not only counter to the Word of God, it is poison to a society and its individuals.

THE FILIPINO MIND: A Persistently "Damaged" Culture